Over 80 varieties of 

Organic and Nongmo seeds

All the seeds to meet your needs

We are proud to source only organic and nonGMO seeds from our amazing partners, High Mowing Seed Company and Johnny's Select Seeds. Enjoy a massive library of plants specially selected for vigorous fast growth, and delicious culinary applications. 

Arugula

Arugula is a wildly popular salad green variety, famed for its broad taste profile and many pairings. Young arugula is mild and sweet, and more mature greens offer a spicier pepper-mustard taste. 


How to harvest and use arugula:Arugula, like most salad greens and leafy herbs (like cilantro and dill), has a central cluster where stems continually grow outwards and develop new leaves. It can be harvested with a pair of scissors by gently clipping the stems of the larger, most mature, outside leaves of the cluster, as close to base as possible.

Arugula: Wasabi

Wasabi Arugula is a fun and funky cousin to traditional Arugula, and has a spicy taste very similar to wasabi! It's a great plant to grow if you're a fan of vegetarian sushi, stir-fries, or want to spice up some tacos!


How to harvest and use arugula: Arugula, like most salad greens and leafy herbs (like cilantro and dill), has a central cluster where stems continually grow outwards and develop new leaves. It can be harvested with a pair of scissors by gently clipping the stems of the larger, most mature, outside leaves of the cluster, as close to base as possible.

Basil: Cinnamon

Cinnamon Basil is a fun and funky cousin to traditional sweet Basil, and imparts a cinnamon-like taste and fragrance to any meal. Use it in baked goods for a botanical infusion of cinnamon!


Harvesting information:Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Greek

Greek Basil: The chia pet of the herb world, Greek Basil has adorable little leaf clusters and a great sweet basil taste. Perfect for garnishing pasta dishes or making salad dressings or sauces. 


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Lemon

Lemon Basil: With a strong citrus flavor and aroma, Lemon Basil makes a great pair with fish, salads, cocktails, and more! This herb also acts as a natural mosquito and gnat repellant due to its powerful fragrance.


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Lime

Lime Basil: Like its Lemon counterpart, Lime Basil brings an effervescent citrus flavor and scent. Its flavor profile lends itself wonderfully to seafood recipes as well as aromatic cocktails.


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Purple

Purple Basil: These glossy, deep purple leaves are strikingly beautiful and both edible and ornamental. Delicious in vinegars, infused oils, or as a garnish for your favorite meals, the deep basil flavor is well-suited to cooking. Purple pesto is one of our favorite dishes to make!


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Sweet

Sweet Basil: Classic Italian basil aroma and flavor-- these big beautiful leaves are perfect for all your pizza, pasta, and pesto desires. 


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Thai

Thai Basil: Narrow, spear-like leaves produce a savory anise-clove flavor, which makes it very versatile in culinary applications. Popular in Asian cuisine, often used in vegetable stir-fries and noodle dishes, it can also be a great addition when garnishing a dessert. 


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Basil: Tulsi

Tulsi, aka Sacred Basil: With a considerable list of health benefits and medicinal properties, Tulsi (also called Holy Basil or Sacred Basil), is much more than just a flavorful herb. Tulsi is very popular in teas and cocktails, and imparts a sweet and fruity taste and smell that’s incredibly similar to blueberries! It is also a delicious addition to any chicken dish.


Harvesting information: Basil requires a special harvesting method to ensure its continued growth and survival. If you have ever purchased a basil plant at the store before, brought it home, and harvested it by simply plucking off leaves when desired, then you are familiar with the outcome of a basil plant that grew taller and taller until it fell over and died. 


For a basil plant to reach its maximal size and output, it needs to be harvested in a way which encourages horizontal growth. When you pluck off individual leaves, the plant puts its effort into growing vertically, and the stem eventually gets too tall to support its own weight and the plant collapses and dies. To harvest basil correctly, you will need to use a pair of sharp scissors and cut the main stem of the plant directly above one of the plant’s nodes. A node is a junction on the stem where two sets of leaves emerge perpendicularly out of either side of the stem. When you clip a basil plant on the stem directly above a node, you will harvest all of the plant that has grown above it, and also you will encourage 2 new shoots to grow out from the node. By continually harvesting with this method you will promote healthy horizontal growth and be able to enjoy a bountiful basil bush!


Beans: Dragon Bush

Dragon Bush Bean: Also known as Dragon's Tongue Beans, this unique, purple-streaked, legume has a fresh flavor making it perfect for snacking while tending to your plants. Very versatile when cooking, you can even shell them for the beans inside.


Companion plants that grow well:Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumbers, Peas, Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, and Sage. 


Harvesting information: Beans are quick to produce fruit ready for harvest, and the more frequently beans are harvested, the more veggies the plants will develop. 


As you can expect, harvesting beans is not a difficult task. You simply grab a bean and firmly snap the stem at the top. The bigger question, however, is knowing when to grab a bean off of a plant. If you harvest a bean too early, there won’t be much to harvest but the bean will be crisp and sweet, if you harvest a bean too late there will be a sizable harvest, however, the fruit will have become tough and woody. The sweet spot is usually somewhere in the middle, where the beans have grown to a large enough scale where it’s worth harvesting them, but are still young enough to retain their crisp sweetness. 


Beans: French Green

Maxibel Haricot Vert, aka French Green Beans: Expect to have beans coming out of your ears with this variety! Long and slender in body, this French filet bean is perfect when steamed with butter and salt or eaten raw, fresh off the plant.


Companion plants that grow well:Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumbers, Peas, Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, and Sage. 


Harvesting information: Beans are quick to produce fruit ready for harvest, and the more frequently beans are harvested, the more veggies the plants will develop. 


As you can expect, harvesting beans is not a difficult task. You simply grab a bean and firmly snap the stem at the top. The bigger question, however, is knowing when to grab a bean off of a plant. If you harvest a bean too early, there won’t be much to harvest but the bean will be crisp and sweet, if you harvest a bean too late there will be a sizable harvest, however, the fruit will have become tough and woody. The sweet spot is usually somewhere in the middle, where the beans have grown to a large enough scale where it’s worth harvesting them, but are still young enough to retain their crisp sweetness. 


Beans: Provider Bush

Provider Bush Bean: A classic green bean with production that comes through early and often. Keep harvesting to encourage continuous production. Crisp juicy beans are great in salads, cooked, or canned.


Companion plants that grow well:Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumbers, Peas, Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, and Sage. 


Harvesting information: Beans are quick to produce fruit ready for harvest, and the more frequently beans are harvested, the more veggies the plants will develop. 


As you can expect, harvesting beans is not a difficult task. You simply grab a bean and firmly snap the stem at the top. The bigger question, however, is knowing when to grab a bean off of a plant. If you harvest a bean too early, there won’t be much to harvest but the bean will be crisp and sweet, if you harvest a bean too late there will be a sizable harvest, however, the fruit will have become tough and woody. The sweet spot is usually somewhere in the middle, where the beans have grown to a large enough scale where it’s worth harvesting them, but are still young enough to retain their crisp sweetness. 


Beets

Detroit Red Beets: Beets are a wondrously dynamic plant, equally famous for their crisp and succulent greens as well as their bulbous red roots. Beet roots are an absolute staple in the kitchen during the fall and winter, and can be easily prepared with only a dash of olive oil and a hot oven! Like a carrot, beets develop their edible red roots beneath the soil, while leafy greens grow above the top and capture sunlight to bring nutrients and sugars down to the root. Especially during the first couple weeks of growth, beet greens are prized for their deliciously sweet taste and are used in salads, sandwiches, and as garnishes.


Companion plants that grow well: Beans, Lettuce, and Onions


Harvesting information: Like carrots, harvesting beet roots is a very intuitive process involving vertically pulling the root out of the soil. You will notice the top of the root (shoulders) beginning to appear above the surface of the soil, which can help indicate its size and know when to harvest. Beet greens can be harvested similarly to arugula and other salad greens, by clipping off the outer leaves of the cluster with scissors. You will need to leave approximately 2/3rd of the beet greens behind after each harvest to ensure that the rest of the plant and its root can still photosynthesize and develop.


Borage

Borage: is a ridiculously cool flowering plant that produces beautifully ornate star-shaped pink, purple, and blue flowers! What makes the Borage plant even cooler is the fact that its edible flowers taste like cucumbers, and the plant attracts pollinators like bees and butterflies!  


Companion plants that grow well: Squash, Tomatoes, Beans, Flowers, and any other flowering/fruiting plants that can benefit from the pollinators Borage attracts!


Harvesting information: The Borage flower will develop in several clusters around the plant, and range in coloration from pink to purple to blue. The star shaped flowers can be easily plucked with your fingers, or snipped with a pair of scissors or garden shears. The flowers impart a subtle sweetness that is remarkably similar to cucumber! The flowers can decoratively adorn a cocktail, can be elegantly trapped within ice cubes, or can easily add a splash of color and taste to any meal you make!


Broccoli: Crown

Belstar F1 Broccoli: Beautiful compact broccoli crowns which are delicious chopped into florets and steamed, sauteed in olive oil, or folded into creamy mac and cheese. 


Companion plants that grow well: Celery, onions, garlic, shallots, leeks, beets, bush beans, dill, lettuce, spinach, rhubarb, cucumbers, Swiss chard, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Broccoli heads can be harvested with a serrated knife or sharp pair of pruning shears. The heads can be harvested when the buds of the head are firm and tight, right before the heads begin to flower. As soon as you see and yellow flower petals, you should harvest immediately.Harvest broccoli heads in the morning for the best tasting plant, and cut the head of the plant taking at least 6” of the stem below the head. Cut the stem at a slight downward angle. So long as you continue to water and add nutrients to the plant, and the temperature isn’t too hot, then your broccoli will continue to develop new shoots and provide you with additional harvests!


Broccoli: Sprouting

Santee F1 Sprouting Broccoli: Abundant mini purple broccolini heads are tender, flavorful, and healthy. Sear them with chilis or sautee them with in garlic sauce as a delicious side dish. 


Companion plants that grow well: Celery, onions, garlic, shallots, leeks, beets, bush beans, dill, lettuce, spinach, rhubarb, cucumbers, Swiss chard, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Broccoli heads can be harvested with a serrated knife or sharp pair of pruning shears. The heads can be harvested when the buds of the head are firm and tight, right before the heads begin to flower. As soon as you see and yellow flower petals, you should harvest immediately.Harvest broccoli heads in the morning for the best tasting plant, and cut the head of the plant taking at least 6” of the stem below the head. Cut the stem at a slight downward angle. So long as you continue to water and add nutrients to the plant, and the temperature isn’t too hot, then your broccoli will continue to develop new shoots and provide you with additional harvests!


Buzz Buttons

Buzz Buttons: Meet the coolest darn plant in the Seedsheet catalog, the Buzz Button, also known as Spilanthes, the electric daisy, the toothache plant, or as we lovingly call it, “Nature’s Pop Rocks.” Buzz Buttons are a flowering plant that prolifically produces an abundance of acorn-shaped yellow flowers that emerge from a dense shrubby vine. The flowers of the Buzz Button are edible, and create a tingling sensation in your mouth like you’ve never experienced! Some liken the feeling to licking a 9-volt battery (but in a good way), or drinking an especially carbonated soda. When chewed, the Buzz Button flowers create an effervescent bubbling sensation in your mouth while simultaneously imparting a deep floral taste not unlike a dandelion. The flowers can be used to rim a cocktail glass, ground up into a chocolatey dessert, or add some POW to a summer salad. We absolutely love the plant, and are sure that anyone that grows it will be blown away by its magical powers!


Harvesting information: You can harvest both the flowers and leaves of a Buzz Button. The flowers have the densest concentration of mouth-numbing awesomeness, but the leaves will also add a more mild and subdued spice to any meal. The flowers can be easily harvested by simply plucking them off with your fingers, or cut with a pair of scissors. As the flowers begin to develop you should harvest quickly, and the plant will put more effort into developing new flowers. You will be able to get several weeks worth of harvests!


Calendula

Calendula: A true deep orange calendula with bright flame-colored ruffled flowers. Well suited for bouquets, these blooms will continuously flower throughout the growing season.


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Peas, Carrots, Asparagus, Spring salad vegetables.


Harvesting information: Calendula flowers can be cut as soon as the "heads" open and pedals emerge out. You should "dead head" any flowers if they bloom and fade, by cutting off the stem with the dead flower. This will encourage the plant to put its energy into producing more flowers!


Cantaloupe

PMR Delicious Cantaloupe: This reliably early melon, ripens quickly for heavy yields of aromatic fruit. Its juicy, perfectly sweet flesh is dark orange with creamy texture and strong flavor, making it perfect for off-the-vine snacking or incorporating into fruit bowls or sweet garden cocktails!


Companion plants that grow well: Corn, pumpkin, squash, collards, borage, oregano, radishes, marigolds, petunias and beans.


Harvesting information: Cantaloupes are ready to be harvested when the rind is a dark yellow or cream color. A ripe, sweet cantaloupe gives off a musky scent (hence the nickname "Musk Melon"), so take a deep whiff and if the rind is creamy-colored and musk is in the air, then you're ready to harvest! A ripe melon should easily separate from the vine, however sometimes they can be stubborn and require pruning shears or serrated knife.


Carrot: Dragon

Dragon Carrot: Vibrant purple skinned carrots with bright orange flesh and yellow core. Spicy, yet sweet flavor make these gorgeous, delicious and healthy in soups, salads, stir-fries and beyond. 


Companion plants that grow well: Tomatoes, chives, onion, leeks, sage, and parsley.


Harvesting information: Carrots can be harvested while small, sweet, and succulent as baby carrots at 45-50 days, or when robust and crisp mature carrots at 60-70 days.


When carrots are mature, their “shoulders” will be visible above the soil surface because they push up while they grow. Gently grasp the base of the carrot fronds at the top of the shoulders and pull firmly up to extract the root from the soil. If your carrot is particularly stubborn, you may need to wiggle the root back and forth to loosen the soil holding the carrot, being careful not to snap the wascally carrot!


Carrot: Cosmic Purple

Cosmic Purple Carrot: Deep purple skin contrast a brilliant orange interior offering a different take on the traditional carrot look. Adding a bit of spice to the usual sweet taste of more typical carrot varieties, this rad, root vegetable steals the show in salads and stews.


Companion plants that grow well: Tomatoes, chives, onion, leeks, sage, and parsley.


Harvesting information: Carrots can be harvested while small, sweet, and succulent as baby carrots at 45-50 days, or when robust and crisp mature carrots at 60-70 days.


When carrots are mature, their “shoulders” will be visible above the soil surface because they push up while they grow. Gently grasp the base of the carrot fronds at the top of the shoulders and pull firmly up to extract the root from the soil. If your carrot is particularly stubborn, you may need to wiggle the root back and forth to loosen the soil holding the carrot, being careful not to snap the wascally carrot!


Carrot: Napoli

Napoli Carrot: Fast-growing classic orange carrot variety. Perfectly sweet for snacking, or shred them and make a cake! It's not technically a desert if its made from veggies... 


Companion plants that grow well: Tomatoes, chives, onion, leeks, sage, and parsley.


Harvesting information: Carrots can be harvested while small, sweet, and succulent as baby carrots at 45-50 days, or when robust and crisp mature carrots at 60-70 days.


When carrots are mature, their “shoulders” will be visible above the soil surface because they push up while they grow. Gently grasp the base of the carrot fronds at the top of the shoulders and pull firmly up to extract the root from the soil. If your carrot is particularly stubborn, you may need to wiggle the root back and forth to loosen the soil holding the carrot, being careful not to snap the wascally carrot!


Catnip

Catnip: Beloved by cats but also an ornamental and medicinal plant with relaxing properties. Dry leaves for a year-round cat treat, leaving flowers as a treat for the bees. Catnip is an excellent companion plant as it helps repel flea-beetles, as well as mosquitos!


Companion plants that grow well: Collards, broccoli, chard, tomatoes.


Harvesting information: Catnip can be harvested for both its flowers and its leaves. Pick catnip leaves when the plants are flowering, around mid-summer. This is when the compounds that cats love most are at peak levels in the leaves. Harvest the leaves in the afternoon or evening, when the dew has dried so you minimize the risks of the harvest getting moldy. Hang the plant in a cool dry place. 


Cauliflower

Cauliflower: A growing favorite among our customers, especially with the rising trends of cauliflower rice and cauliflower pizza dough! Whether you enjoy it sauteéd, baked, or slathered with hot sauce, you can't go wrong with fresh cauliflower!


Companion plants that grow well: Beets, broccoli, spinach, cucumber, corn, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Like broccoli, you should harvest the crown of the cauliflower by cutting the vine at a sloped angle about 10" beneath the crown. Once the head, or crown, develops into the dense head (like you see in stores) then it is ready to be harvested. If flowers start to emerge from the crown you should harvest immediately. 


Celery: Herb

Celery Herb: Unlike the celery stalks you see in supermarkets, this celery herb produces a bouquet of leaves similar to cilantro. The herb imparts the signature celery taste, making it a great garnish to meals or salads, or as the perfect compliment to your botanical bloody mary!


Companion plants that grow well: Bush beans, cabbage, cauliflower, leeks, onions, spinach, and tomatoes.


Harvesting information: Like other leafy herbs, you can harvest Celery Herb with a pair of scissors, cutting off the larger outer stems by the base. Only harvest up to 1/3 of the plant at a time, which allows the plant to continue photosynthesizing and producing continuous harvests!


Chard

Chard: Dark leafy greens with dark red stems have a mild and slightly bitter flavor like a mix of spinach and beet greens. Native to the Mediterranean, chard is quick and easy to cook up in a variety of recipes with many preparation methods to choose from.


Companion plants that grow well: Tomatoes, beans, flowers, cabbage, lettuce, greens, and onions.


Harvesting information: Chard can be harvested at either the baby or mature growth stage.Using a sharp knife, garden snips or scissors, trim stalks about 1 inch above the base of the plant.Chard is excellent sauteéd, and the stems make for perfect colorful pickling!


Chard: Rainbow

Rainbow Chard: Dark leafy greens with a gorgeous kaleidoscope of colorful stems which are mild and slightly bitter in flavor like a mix of spinach and beet greens. Native to the Mediterranean, chard is quick and easy to cook up in a variety of recipes with many preparation methods to choose from.


Companion plants that grow well: Tomatoes, beans, flowers, cabbage, lettuce, greens, and onions.


Harvesting information: Chard can be harvested at either the baby or mature growth stage.Using a sharp knife, garden snips or scissors, trim stalks about 1 inch above the base of the plant.Chard is excellent sauteéd, and the stems make for perfect colorful pickling!


Chives

Chives: Popular as a gourmet garnish, or ingredient to spice up a salad, chives are an easy and prolific plant to grow. 


Companion plants that grow well: Carrots, parsley, broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, kohlrabi, mustard, peppers, flowers, squash, and tomatoes.


Harvesting information: Chives can be simply cut with scissors when at the desired length. After cutting, the plant will continue to grow, especially if you leave 2/3 of the plant behind after each harvest.


Chives: Garlic

Garlic Chives: This chive variety has a garlic taste, which makes it an excellent addition to any poultry dish or stir-fry! Popular as a gourmet garnish, or ingredient to spice up a salad, chives are an easy and prolific plant to grow. 


Companion plants that grow well: Carrots, parsley, broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, kohlrabi, mustard, peppers, flowers, squash, and tomatoes.


Harvesting information: Chives can be simply cut with scissors when at the desired length. After cutting, the plant will continue to grow, especially if you leave 2/3 of the plant behind after each harvest.


Cilantro

Cilantro: You either love it or hate it! Unfortunately, for about half the people on our planet, Cilantro tastes like soap... But for the lucky half, it is one of the most glorious herbs, and the signature element in any guacamolé!


Companion plants that grow well: Beans, peas, tomatoes, pepperes, squash, and corn.


Harvesting information: Cilantro, like salad greens, can be harvested with scissors, by cutting the base of the largest, outermost leaves. Only harvest up to 1/3 of the plant at a time so the plant can continue to grow and provide more harvestable bounty!


Corn

Corn: There is absolutely nothing better than eating an ear of corn fresh off the vine... Fine, I guess you can boil or grill it if you have the patience! Our sweet corn grows quickly and can usually produce 1-3 ears per stalk. 


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, lettuce, melons, peas, beans, squash, and sunflowers.


Harvesting information: Corn is easily harvested by simultaneously pulling down and twisting an ear until it separates with a deliciously crunchy sound! Corn is ready to be harvested 20 days after the first silk (tassles coming out of the top of the ear) appears. When the silk has turned brown it's ready to be harvested!


Cucamelon

Cucamelon: This might be our personal favorite plant in the Seedsheet catalog, because it's so darn cute! The cucamelon (or Mexican Gherkin) is about the size of a large olive, but looks identical to a watermelon! The green spheres of goodness have the signature watermelon striping, and makes you feel like a giant as you pop them whole into your mouth! The taste is akin to a cucumber, with a mild sourness which is great sliced in a salad, or cucamelon makes the absolute best cocktail garnish ever!


Companion plants that grow well: Marigolds, nasturtiums, beans, celery, corn, lettuce, dill, peas, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Cucamelons can be harvested like any cucumber, by firmly grasping the fruit and pulling until it comes off. Frequent harvesting of the fruit will help the plant put its energy into producing more, so pick often! Cucamelons are ready to be harvested when they are roughly the size of a large olive. 


Cucumber: Lemon

Lemon Cucumber: This wildly prolific cucumber variety produces an abundance of tennis-ball-sized spheres of cucumber goodness! Chop up in a salad, infuse with water, make the coolest pickles ever, or simply enjoy right off the vine!


Companion plants that grow well: Marigolds, nasturtiums, beans, celery, corn, lettuce, dill, peas, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Lemon cucumbers can be harvested like any cucumber, by firmly grasping the fruit and pulling until it comes off. Frequent harvesting of the fruit will help the plant put its energy into producing more, so pick often! Lemon cucumbers are ready to be harvested when they are roughly the size of a tennis ball. Ripe fruit will have a bright yellow skin, and gradually turn darker as they mature past their prime.


Cucumber: Manny F1

Manny F1 Cucumber: This traditional cucumber variety is an extremely hardy and fast growing plant that will produce ample harvests, even in tough cold climates. It's great for snacking off the vine, or combined into meals and salads.


Companion plants that grow well: Marigolds, nasturtiums, beans, celery, corn, lettuce, dill, peas, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Manny F1 cucumbers can be harvested like any cucumber, by firmly grasping the fruit and pulling until it comes off. Frequent harvesting of the fruit will help the plant put its energy into producing more, so pick often! 


Cucumber: National Pickling

National Pickling Cucumber: This pickling cucumber variety is a vigorous fast-growing plant that will produce large harvests of cucumbers destined for the pickling jar! Pair with fennel and dill to create your own Pickle Seedsheet!


Companion plants that grow well: Marigolds, nasturtiums, beans, celery, corn, lettuce, dill, peas, and radishes.


Harvesting information: National Pickling cucumbers can be harvested like any cucumber, by firmly grasping the fruit and pulling until it comes off. Frequent harvesting of the fruit will help the plant put its energy into producing more, so pick often! 


Dill

Dill: This popular herb is a staple in most herb gardens, due to its easy growth, and obvious delicious taste! Great on poultry, seafood, sauces and dips, dill is the perfect plant to incorporate into almost any meal!


Companion plants that grow well: Corn, cucumbers, onions, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, and basil.


Harvesting information: Dill can be harvested like cilantro and salad greens, by using a pair of scissors and cutting the largest, outermost leaves near the stems' base. Harvest only up to 1/3 of the plant at a time, thereby leaving the remaining plant to continue photosynthesizing and growing more delicious harvests!


Edamame

Edamame: Everyone's favorite appetizer, edamame is a delicious bean variety that is beyond delicious with just a light steam with olive oil and salt. It is a fast growing and fairly prolific plant that will provide continuous harvests.


Companion plants that grow well: Corn, cucumbers, fruit, and celery.


Harvesting information: Edamame, like most bean varieties, can be harvested by gently pulling the ripe beans until they "pop" off the stem. Edamame is ready to be harvested once two to three beans are visibly protruding inside the husk.


Eggplant

Eggplant: From eggplant parm to baba ganoush, eggplant is a wondrously versatile (and delicious) veggie that is a dream to grow, and even better to eat! Roast it, smoke it, bake it, or fry it, you can't go wrong!


Companion plants that grow well: Peppers, tomatoes, spinach, greens, peas, thyme, and marigolds.


Harvesting information: Eggplants can be simply harvest by cutting the stem directly above the fruit with shears or a serrated knife. Eggplants are ready to be harvested when dark purple and approximately >6" long. 


Fennel: Bronze Leaf

Bronze Leaf Fennel: Fennel has a wildly pungent aroma, which makes for a delicious cocktail ingredient, or can be paired as a garnish on strong meats.  


Companion plants that grow well: Fennel is a fairly unfriendly plant, and it's not usually recommended to grow near other fruiting plants. It does grow well with dill, and we've had success growing it with our pickling cucumbers, which combined in a mason jar makes for excellent pickles!


Harvesting information: Like dill, fennel is harvested with a pair of scissors by snipping the base of the largest, outermost fennel fronds. Only harvest up to 1/3 of the plant at a time to enable continuous growth and additional harvests.


Fennel: Bulb

Fennel Bulb: Fennel bulbs are mild and pleasantly verdant, and when roasted or braised, they turn silky. They make an excellent companion to any roasted poultry, and soak up the flavorful drippings for a melt-in-your-mouth delicacy. 


Companion plants that grow well: Fennel is a fairly unfriendly plant, and it's not usually recommended to grow near other fruiting plants. It does grow well with dill, and we've had success growing it with our pickling cucumbers, which combined in a mason jar makes for excellent pickles!


Harvesting information: Like carrots, fennel bulbs are ready for harvest when their white "shoulders" start to appear above the surface of the soil. They can be harvested by gently tugging upwards from the soil, and may occasionally require some jiggling to loosen up the soil.


Greens: Golden Frills Mustard Fills

Golden Frills Mustard Greens: This hardy and fast growing greens variety has the mustardy taste famous in salads. This variety can be harvested just 2-3 weeks after planting!


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, parsley, carrots, onions, and peppers.


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, harvest the Golden Frills Mustard Greens by either pinching or cutting with scissors the largest, outermost leaves near the plant's base. Only cut up to 1/3 of the plant with each harvest so the remaining plant can continue to grow and produce more!


Greens: Purple Mizuna

Purple Mizuna Greens: This hardy and fast growing Asian green has a vibrant purple color, sure to make any salad stand out! It is also a great addition to any stir-fry, noodle dish, or garnish on any home cooked masterpiece.


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, parsley, carrots, onions, and peppers.


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, harvest the Purple Mizuna Greens by either pinching or cutting with scissors the largest, outermost leaves near the plant's base. Only cut up to 1/3 of the plant with each harvest so the remaining plant can continue to grow and produce more!


Greens: Ruby Streaks Mustard

Ruby Streaks Mustard Greens: This hardy and fast growing mustard green features colorful red streaks to add a splash of saturation to any salad. Younger small leaves will be sweet in flavor, while older leaves will have the signature bitterness of the mustard. Enjoy your first harvests just weeks after planting!


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, parsley, carrots, onions, and peppers.


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, harvest the Ruby Streaks Mustard Greens by either pinching or cutting with scissors the largest, outermost leaves near the plant's base. Only cut up to 1/3 of the plant with each harvest so the remaining plant can continue to grow and produce more!


Greens: Spinach

Greens: Spinach

Spinach Greens: Popeye's favorite plant, and for a reason! High in protein, and tastes far superior when it's fresh out of the garden, rather than soggy out of a supermarket clamshell. Enjoy in salads, stir-fries, smoothies, or sautéed!


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, parsley, carrots, onions, and peppers.


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, harvest the Spinach Greens by either pinching or cutting with scissors the largest, outermost leaves near the plant's base. Only cut up to 1/3 of the plant with each harvest so the remaining plant can continue to grow and produce more!


Greens: Tat Soi

Tat Soi Greens: This wildly popular Asian variety has become the trendiest green lately, finding its way into every salad joint in the country! Whether in salads, soups, noodles, or stir-fries, this sweet and adorable plant will surely leave you wanting more.


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, parsley, carrots, onions, and peppers.


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, harvest the Tat Soi Greens by either pinching or cutting with scissors the largest, outermost leaves near the plant's base. Only cut up to 1/3 of the plant with each harvest so the remaining plant can continue to grow and produce more!


Ground Cherry

Ground Cherry, aka Husk Cherry: Ground cherries are from the tomato family, and taste like a magical amalgamation of tomatoes, grapes, and tropical fruit! Their sweet, yet tart, cherry-like fruit grows within a papery outer husk (like a tomatillo), and has an almost grape-like consistency. They are excellent pureed in a sweet salsa, can be baked into a sweet and savory pie, or are as addicting as cherry tomatoes eating right off the vine!


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, parsley, carrots, onions, and peppers.


Harvesting information: Like cherry tomatoes or tomatillos, ground cherries can be picked off the vine when the fruits are tender and juicy, and the husks are light and paper-like. When they are roughly the size of a large marble they are ready for snacking!


Kale: Dinosaur

Dinosaur Kale: Roaaaaar! While it's no T-rex, this dino kale is our most popular kale variety, as it yields massive season-long harvests, and is absolutely delicious in salads, smoothies, and whatever other culinary creations you concoct!


Companion plants that grow well: Beets, celery, cucumbers, herbs, onions, spinach, chard, lettuce, greens, basil, cilantro, dill, thyme, and sage. 


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, you can harvest kale with your hands or with scissors by removing the largest, outermost leaves at the base of the stems. Leave at least 2/3 of the plant in tact with each harvest to promote continuous growth and recurring harvests.


Kale: Red Russian

Red Russian Kale: This kale variety features red stems and ruffled leaves, and is delicious paired with olive oil and lemon in a salad, baked into crispy fried kale, whirled into a healthy smoothie, or munched on rabbit-style right out of the garden!


Companion plants that grow well: Beets, celery, cucumbers, herbs, onions, spinach, chard, lettuce, greens, basil, cilantro, dill, thyme, and sage. 


Harvesting information: Like most salad greens, you can harvest kale with your hands or with scissors by removing the largest, outermost leaves at the base of the stems. Leave at least 2/3 of the plant in tact with each harvest to promote continuous growth and recurring harvests.


Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm: This mint cousin grows bushy lemon-scented leaves which are perfect steeped into an herbal tea, infused into your favorite cocktail, or garnished on any poultry or seafood dish. 


Companion plants that grow well: Squash, melons, tomatoes, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, onions, and fennel.


Harvesting information: Like basil, lemon balm is harvested by clipping the main stem of the plant directly above a "node", or junction where two lateral stems grow out from the main stem. This will promote more growth by encouraging the plant to direct its energy to growing out from the lateral stems. Moral of the story, the more you harvest, the bigger the plant can get!


Lettuce: Emerald Oak

Emerald Oak Butterhead Lettuce: This butterhead variety produces a large bouquet of deliciously sweet and crunchy lettuce, and is our absolute favorite for salads. While it is a little slower to grow than the smaller greens varieties, the buttery sweetness more than makes up for it!


Companion plants that grow well: beets, broccoli, bush and pole beans, carrots, cucumbers, dill, onion, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Butterhead lettuce varieties are a one-and-done plant, and are harvested by using a serrated knife to cut the base of the plant where it meets the soil. 


Lettuce: Salad Mix

Salad Mix Lettuce: Just add dressing! This beautiful lettuce mixture includes a variety of strong, deep reds and brilliant greens, including oak leaf, romaine, lollo, and red and green leaf types. 


Companion plants that grow well: beets, broccoli, bush and pole beans, carrots, cucumbers, dill, onion, and radishes.


Harvesting information: This Salad Mix Lettuce blend can be harvested like any salad greens, by using scissors or your fingers to cut the base of the older outermost leaves at the stem where it meets the base of the plant. Only harvest 1/3 of the plant, leaving the rest to continue to grow and produce continuous harvests.


Marigold: Dark Orange

Dark Orange Marigold: Nature's natural pesticide! Marigolds are an amazing plant, not only for their beautiful orange flowers, but for their ability to attract beneficial insects, and thwart unwanted intruders! Marigold's pungent smell helps deter rodents, pests, and even deer!


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, gourds, kale, melons, squash and tomatoes.


Harvesting information: Harvest marigold flowers by using scissors to cut the stem of the plant beneath a flower, preferably just above a node to stimulate continuous growth. Be sure to cut out dead flowers so the plant can replace them with new flowers!


Marigold: Tangerine Gem

Tangerine Gem Marigold: This colorful cute marigold variety not only looks amazing, but is edible too and makes a wonderful addition to any salad or cocktail! Marigolds are an amazing plant, not only for their beautiful orange flowers, but for their ability to attract beneficial insects, and thwart unwanted intruders! Marigold's pungent smell helps deter rodents, pests, and even deer!


Companion plants that grow well: Basil, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, gourds, kale, melons, squash and tomatoes.


Harvesting information: Harvest marigold flowers by using scissors to cut the stem of the plant beneath a flower, preferably just above a node to stimulate continuous growth. Be sure to cut out dead flowers so the plant can replace them with new flowers!


Nasturtium

Nasturtium: One of the hardiest, brightest, and just coolest flowers out there! Nasturtiums develop a rainbow of sunset-colored edible flowers with a sweet taste and peppery finish, and are the perfect flourish on any plate or in any glass.


Companion plants that grow well: Broccoli, greens, lettuces, cauliflower, cucumbers, kale, pumpkins, radish, squash, and tomatos.


Harvesting information: Harvest nasturtium flowers by cutting the stem beneath the flower. Frequent harvesting of flowers will help the plant produce more!


Onions: Purple Bunching

Purple Bunching Onions: Bright purple bases are sure to liven up any plate and the savory onion taste pairs decadently with any poultry dish!


Companion plants that grow well: Dill, sage, parsley, beets, sweet peppers, spinach, lettuce, and radishes.


Harvesting information: You can harvest the onions by either cutting off the stems to use in a dish like you would with chives, or alternatively, you can pull the entire plant out of the ground like a carrot to access the bulbous root.


Onions: Scallions

Scallions: A culinary staple and finalé of any gourmet dish! Simply slice up the scallions and sprinkle the hollow rounds salt-bae-style atop any meal for home grown, home cooked perfection!


Companion plants that grow well: Dill, sage, parsley, beets, sweet peppers, spinach, lettuce, and radishes.


Harvesting information: Like purple bunching onions, you can harvest scallions by either cutting off the stems to use in a dish like you would with chives, or alternatively, you can pull the entire plant out of the ground like a carrot to access the bulbous root.


Parsley

Parsley: If it doesn't have parsley, it's not an Italian dish! This herb is mostly known as a garnish, but it's a fragrant and tasteful addition to any meal!


Companion plants that grow well: Tomatoes, chives, carrots, corn, peppers, onions, peas, and other herbs.


Harvesting information: Like greens, you can harvest parsley with a pair of scissors, by clipping the largest outermost leaves at the stem at the plant's base. Harvest 1/3 of the plant at a time to promote continuous growth.


Pea: Cascadia Snap

Cascadia Snap Pea: This main season variety produces heavy yields of juicy, thick-walled pods. Enjoy bucketloads of plump pods with tiny, distinctively delicious peas, perfect for snacking or salads!


Companion plants that grow well: Cilantro, greens, lettuce, spinach, kale, corn, tomatoes, radishes, and eggplant.


Harvesting information: Peas are easily (and enjoyably) harvested by pulling ripe pods directly off the vine!


Pea: Dwarf Grey Sugar Snow

Dwarf Grey Sugar Snow Pea: Dwarf Grey Sugar is a classic favorite loved for its pretty purple flowers and twirling tendrils commonly used in stir-fries, salads and garnishes. 


Companion plants that grow well: Cilantro, greens, lettuce, spinach, kale, corn, tomatoes, radishes, and eggplant.


Harvesting information: Peas are easily (and enjoyably) harvested by pulling ripe pods directly off the vine!


Pea: Petite Snap

Petite Snap Pea: A fun twist on your favorite pea! Not only does this produce delicious crunchy-sweet peas, but it also grows beautiful leafy tendrils which are delightful in a salad or as a garnish.


Companion plants that grow well: Cilantro, greens, lettuce, spinach, kale, corn, tomatoes, radishes, and eggplant.


Harvesting information: Peas are easily (and enjoyably) harvested by pulling ripe pods directly off the vine! The shoots are harvested by using scissors to trim at the base of a branch, providing you only harvest 1/3 of the shoots at a time to promote continuous growth.


Pepper: RingOFire Cayene

RingOFire Cayenne Pepper: Burn, burn, burn, that ring of fire! This sweet yet spicy pepper can go from mild to mouth-fire depending on when it is harvested! Great in hot sauces, stir-fries, or office dares, you can't go wrong with the RingOFire!


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, eggplant, tomatoes, chard, squash, basil, parsley, and oregano. 


Harvesting information: Peppers can be harvested by simply pulling or cutting the fruit (pepper) off from the plant when it's at your desired ripeness. Pick it green for a more subdued heat, or wait for a deep dark red if your a hot sauce fan!


Pepper: Jalapeño

Jalapeño Pepper: Salsa, guacamole, tacos, or wrapped in bacon, jalapeños just make any dish better! This quick-growing pepper variety will leave you drooling!


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, eggplant, tomatoes, chard, squash, basil, parsley, and oregano. 


Harvesting information: Peppers can be harvested by simply pulling or cutting the fruit (pepper) off from the plant when it's at your desired ripeness. Pick it early for a more subdued heat, or let it linger on the vine for a sinus-clensing kick!


Pepper: Large Sweet

Large Sweet Bell Pepper: Some like it hot, some like it not! This sweet orange bell pepper is a hearty quick-growing variety that is made for salads and stir-fries. 


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, eggplant, tomatoes, chard, squash, basil, parsley, and oregano. 


Harvesting information: Peppers can be harvested by simply pulling or cutting the fruit (pepper) off from the plant when it's at your desired ripeness. Pick it green for a more mild flavor profile, or let it sweeten to its golden orange candy color.


Pepper: Mini Sweet

Mini Sweet Bell Pepper: Good things come in a little package! This sweet bell pepper mix features adorable miniature orange, red, and yellow peppers. Ideal for snacking, filling with goat cheese, or incorporating into a colorful salad or pasta dish!


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, eggplant, tomatoes, chard, squash, basil, parsley, and oregano. 


Harvesting information: Peppers can be harvested by simply pulling or cutting the fruit (pepper) off from the plant when it's at your desired ripeness. Pick it green for a more mild flavor profile, or let it sweeten to its sunset hue!


Pepper: Shishito

Shishito Pepper: Famed Japanese pepper notorious for keeping eaters on their toes, as legend says every 10th pepper is hot! Thin walls blister and char easily when roasted or grilled, taking on rich flavor that is delicious with coarse salt and lemon juice!


Companion plants that grow well: Cucumbers, eggplant, tomatoes, chard, squash, basil, parsley, and oregano. 


Harvesting information: Peppers can be harvested by simply pulling or cutting the fruit (pepper) off from the plant when it's at your desired ripeness.


Pumpkin: Jill Be Little

Jill Be Little Pumpkin: Grow your own autumnal cheer with this lovable little pumpkin. It doesn't take up much space, plays well with others, and is a great addition to any custom garden!


Companion plants that grow well: Squash, beens, peas, marigolds, calendula, radish, carrots, zinnias, nasturtiums, and borage.


Harvesting information: Pumpkins are ready for harvest when the fruit has the token Halloween orange coloration, and the vines start to brown and die. Use scissors or a knife to cut the stem directly above the pumpkin.


Pumpkin: Racer

Racer Pumpkin: This pumpkin is so fast growing, it's called the Racer! You can expect 2-3 fruits per plant that weigh between 12-16lbs, perfect for carving, pie making, or general Halloween merriment!


Companion plants that grow well: Squash, beens, peas, marigolds, calendula, radish, carrots, zinnias, nasturtiums, and borage.


Harvesting information: Pumpkins are ready for harvest when the fruit has the token Halloween orange coloration, and the vines start to brown and die. Use scissors or a knife to cut the stem directly above the pumpkin.


Radish: French Breakfast

French Breakfast Radish: Elongated magenta roots with white tips and a spicy bite, perfect raw in salads or cooked in meals. With a crispy crunch, ease of growth through most seasons, and quick maturation, radishes are delightful garden cultivars.


Companion plants that grow well: Carrots, beets, lettuce, spinach, cucumbers, squashes, beans, parsley, peas, and nasturtiums.


Harvesting information: Radishes mature quickly, and are usually ready to harvest between 20-30 days. Once they show their “shoulders” above the soil, they should be harvested before they get too big and pithy. This can happen quicker with warmer weather.


Radish: Valentine's Day

Valentine’s Day Radish Blend: A gorgeous display, with pink, red, purple, and white radishes, you get a little bit of everything!


Companion plants that grow well: Carrots, beets, lettuce, spinach, cucumbers, squashes, beans, parsley, peas, and nasturtiums.


Harvesting information: Radishes mature quickly, and are usually ready to harvest between 20-30 days. Once they show their “shoulders” above the soil, they should be harvested before they get too big and pithy. This can happen quicker with warmer weather.


Radish: Watermelon

Watermelon Radish: Pale white and light green bulbs open to a striking, brilliant pink interior. Beautiful sliced into salads, as a garnish, poached in butter, pickled, or topping tacos.


Companion plants that grow well: Carrots, beets, lettuce, spinach, cucumbers, squashes, beans, parsley, peas, and nasturtiums.


Harvesting information: Radishes mature quickly, and are usually ready to harvest between 20-30 days. Once they show their “shoulders” above the soil, they should be harvested before they get too big and pithy. This can happen quicker with warmer weather.


Sage

Sage: This much adored herb is magnificent when paired with melted butter, or can be fried to crisp and crumbled atop any dish to heighten flavor. It can also add herbaceousness to sauces, meat marinades, compound butters, cheese dishes, and breads. Dress up your cocktails with a leaf or two for peak botanical deliciousness!


Companion plants that grow well: Broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, cabbage, tomatoes, herbs, and beans.


Harvesting information: Harvest sage like any leafy green, by using scissors and trimming the base of the stems of the larger, outermost leaves. Harvest only up to 1/3 of the plant, which helps the plant continue to grow and produce additional harvests.


Sorrel

Sorrel: This surprisingly zesty leafy herb packs a citrusy punch, and is phenomenal in salads, guacamole, or pestos! Add it to any poultry or seafood dish to add a new citrus flair!


Companion plants that grow well: Greens, lettuce, spinach, cabbage, herbs, tomatoes, beans, and sage.


Harvesting information: Harvest sorrel like any leafy green, by using scissors and trimming the base of the stems of the larger outermost leaves. Harvest only up to 1/3 of the plant, which helps the plant continue to grow and produce additional harvests.


Squash: Summer

Summer Squash: You can't have a summer grill-sesh without some garlic-butter marinaded summer squash! Sliced into ribbons or rounds, these squashes are destined for the grill, or can be thinly sliced on a mandolin and added to your favorite ratatouille!


Companion plants that grow well: You can't go wrong with the Three Sisters of corn, beans and squash planted together! Also grows well with radishes, peas, pumpkins, marigolds, and nasturtiums.


Harvesting information: Harvest squash when small and tender for the sweetest flavor, and frequent harvesting will promote additional fruit growth. Harvest squash with a pair of scissors or serrated knife and cutting the stem directly above the fruit.


Squash: Spaghetti

Spaghetti Squash: One of the coolest plants to eat, and a joy to grow. Spaghetti squash is best halved with a knife, and then grilled or roasted until the flesh can be peeled apart with a fork for a delicious vegan pasta! Thin spaghetti-like strands can be transferred to a plate, and topped with a delicious sage butter sauce for an unforgettable meal!


Companion plants that grow well: You can't go wrong with the Three Sisters of corn, beans and squash planted together! Also grows well with radishes, peas, pumpkins, marigolds, and nasturtiums.


Harvesting information: Harvest squash when small and tender for the sweetest flavor, and frequent harvesting will promote additional fruit growth. Harvest squash with a pair of scissors or serrated knife and cutting the stem directly above the fruit.


Squash: Zucchini

Zucchini Squash: Everyone's favorite summer bounty, and one that's sure to please your neighbors too, as you'll undoubtedly grow more than you can eat by yourself! Whether grilled, roasted, baked into a chocolate zucchini cake, or spiralized into zucchini pasta, you can't beat this quintessential taste of summer!


Companion plants that grow well: You can't go wrong with the Three Sisters of corn, beans and squash planted together! Also grows well with radishes, peas, pumpkins, marigolds, and nasturtiums.


Harvesting information: Harvest squash when small and tender for the sweetest flavor, and frequent harvesting will promote additional fruit growth. Harvest squash with a pair of scissors or serrated knife and cutting the stem directly above the fruit.


Sunflower: Limoncello

Limoncello Sunflower: Bright yellow pedals spiral around the night black head of these elegant tall sunflowers, and are sure to bring joy and sunny cheer to any garden they grow in. 


Companion plants that grow well: An excellent companion plant, sunflowers attract a variety of pollinators, and grow well with lettuces, salad greens, tomatoes, beets, cucumbers, onions, radishes, squash, zucchinis, kale, peppers, beans, peas, flowers, and herbs.


Harvesting information: Harvest squash when small and tender for the sweetest flavor, and frequent harvesting will promote additional fruit growth. Harvest squash with a pair of scissors or serrated knife and cutting the stem directly above the fruit.


Sunflower: Strawberry Blonde

Strawberry Blonde Sunflower: A breathtakingly beautiful sunflower variety with cream colored pedals and a bright pink interior gradient. This plant will grow numerous flowers on each stalk, and makes an excellent addition to any garden.


Companion plants that grow well: An excellent companion plant, sunflowers attract a variety of pollinators, and grow well with lettuces, salad greens, tomatoes, beets, cucumbers, onions, radishes, squash, zucchinis, kale, peppers, beans, peas, flowers, and herbs.


Harvesting information: Harvest sunflowers by trimming the stems below the flower heads at the desired height for whatever container you wish to display them in!


Sunflower: Teddy

Teddy Sunflower: A miniature sunflower variety with compact bushy leaves and adorably fuzzy balls of yellow flower pedals. This is a perfect sunflower for Custom Container Seedsheets, and is a great pollinator attractor for your other plants!


Companion plants that grow well: An excellent companion plant, sunflowers attract a variety of pollinators, and grow well with lettuces, salad greens, tomatoes, beets, cucumbers, onions, radishes, squash, zucchinis, kale, peppers, beans, peas, flowers, and herbs.


Harvesting information: Harvest sunflowers by trimming the stems below the flower heads at the desired height for whatever container you wish to display them in!


Thyme

Thyme: A must have for any chef, thyme is an excellent herb to season any meat dish with. An extremely hardy plant, thyme will continue to provide month's worth of harvest, and can be brought indoors for the winter for complete year-round feasting!


Companion plants that grow well: Thyme grows well with other herbs and salad greens, as well as cabbages, tomatoes, eggplants, broccoli, cabbage, and kale.


Harvesting information: Harvest thyme with scissors by trimming the larger, outermost stems near the base of the plant. Be sure to only harvest up to 1/3 of the plant at a time to spur continuous growth for prolonged harvests!


Tomatillo

Tomatillo

Tomato: Glacier

Glacier Tomato: This extremely fast-growing tomato variety is usually ready for harvest in just 55 days! Medium red round fruits are ideal in sauces, capresé salads, or fresh off the vine snacking!


Companion plants that grow well: Plant with basil, beans, borage, calendula, carrots, celery, chive, sunflowers, cucumber, garlic chives, lemon balm, lettuce, marigold, nasturtium, scallions, parsley, peas, sage, and squash.


Harvesting information: Harvest tomatoes in the morning for optimal taste, and pick off the plant by firmly pulling the fruit and snapping the stem directly above the fruit. Tomatoes are ready to be harvested when the fruit is dark red, if the fruit begins to crack you should harvest immediately.

Tomato: Moskvich

Moskvich Tomato: This large beefsteak variety produces large fist-sized fruits that are perfect in capresé salads, or simply paired with olive oil and salt atop toast. There's nothing better than a ripe beefsteak tomato!


Companion plants that grow well: Plant with basil, beans, borage, calendula, carrots, celery, chive, sunflowers, cucumber, garlic chives, lemon balm, lettuce, marigold, nasturtium, scallions, parsley, peas, sage, and squash.


Harvesting information: Harvest tomatoes in the morning for optimal taste, and pick off the plant by firmly pulling the fruit and snapping the stem directly above the fruit. Tomatoes are ready to be harvested when the fruit is dark red, if the fruit begins to crack you should harvest immediately.

Tomato: Sungold Cherry

Sungold Cherry Tomato: This is without a doubt our favorite tomato variety, because it's essentially candy! The brilliant orange clusters of juicy small fruits are impossible to walk by without snacking on a few. An extremely vigorous plant, we've seen well over two hundred tomatoes grow on a single plant! A great plant to get kids excited about gardening.


Companion plants that grow well: Plant with basil, beans, borage, calendula, carrots, celery, chive, sunflowers, cucumber, garlic chives, lemon balm, lettuce, marigold, nasturtium, scallions, parsley, peas, sage, and squash.


Harvesting information: Harvest tomatoes in the morning for optimal taste, and pick off the plant by firmly pulling the fruit and snapping the stem directly above the fruit. Tomatoes are ready to be harvested when the fruit is dark red, if the fruit begins to crack you should harvest immediately. Frequent harvesting of this cherry variety will help the plant focus its energy on producing more fruit, so harvest regularly and enjoy!

Watermelon: Sugar Baby

Sugar Baby Watermelon: This miniature watermelon produces fast growing and deliciously sweet fruit. While they only grow to 7-8" long, they pack a full-sized flavor perfect for picnics, grill-outs, or watermelon daiquiris for balcony soirées. 


Companion plants that grow well: A great companion plant, watermelons grow well with peas, beans, onions, leeks, chives, garlic, greens, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, kale, spinach, sunflowers, and lettuce.


Harvesting information: There's nothing worse than spending the time nurturing your sugar baby, but harvesting too early and finding the fruit unripe. You can tell when a watermelon is ripe with three indicators: 1) The rind of the fruit turns from a bright neon green to a deep dark green, 2) The tendrils (vine) of the plant turns brown and starts to crack, and 3) The "belly" of the watermelon (the part resting on the ground) turns to a creamy yellow hue. When these three indicators are showing, you're ready to reap your sweet reward!

Zinnia: Giant Purple

Zinnia: Giant Purple

Zinnia: Golden Yellow

Golden Yellow Zinnia: A beautiful yellow addition to any garden. Bright flowers emerge from tall stems, making a perfect cutting flower for vases and decorating. 


Companion plants that grow well: Zinnias are great companion plants for nearly every herb, vegetable, and fruit plant, because they attract beneficial pollinators like bees and butterflies, as well as lady bugs which help fight off invasive insects. 


Harvesting information: Like marigolds, harvest zinnias with scissors or shears by cutting the stem of each flower at the desired length to fit in whatever container you wish to display them in. Be sure to cut out dead flowers to promote additional growth of new flowers.

Zinnia: OK Golden Yellow

OK Golden Yellow Zinnia: Large puffy, fuzzy yellow flowers top this adorable zinnia plant, adding a splash of color and attracting beneficial pollinators to your garden. Bright flowers emerge from tall stems, making a perfect cutting flower for vases and decorating. 


Companion plants that grow well: Zinnias are great companion plants for nearly every herb, vegetable, and fruit plant, because they attract beneficial pollinators like bees and butterflies, as well as lady bugs which help fight off invasive insects. 


Harvesting information: Like marigolds, harvest zinnias with scissors or shears by cutting the stem of each flower at the desired length to fit in whatever container you wish to display them in. Be sure to cut out dead flowers to promote additional growth of new flowers.